Skip to content

climate change

Heathrow Blocked!

Sometimes you get a win.

Just earlier this morning, a Court of Appeal ruling declared that the proposed expansion to Heathrow Airport was illegal according to our obligations to the Paris Agreement climate talks.

I’m hoping that this ruling indicates a shift towards a more broader recognition of climate laws, not because I think that legislation is going to fix our wounded relationship to the rest of the natural world… That sort of work has got to happen on a much deeper, and much more radical level. But this ruling should give us some joy because legislation, in the general theory of societies, is supposed to rely upon the notion of Common Justice. Or what is ‘naturally held to be true’. What are the principles that we wish our society to live by, and be known for?

What do we hold sacred, as environmentalist thinker Charles Eistenstein asks?

Every win is a step towards a better, wider horizon. Every win for this sacredness of the earth means that, tomorrow, we might be able to do more. We might be able to make bigger shifts. We might trust companies a little less, and our own feelings about the environment a little more.

The Paris Climate Agreement (as limited as it may be in some ways) is about the future. It’s about caring for the future of the planet, and that means all us creatures and beings on this weird little ball, and who will be born or sprout here after. I’m hoping this judgement means that in some small way, the UK cares for the same things, too.

 

Disabled Spaces/Feral Spaces: Living Lexicon

 

Much like the social construction of my own body, ravaged environments were “wounded space[s],” colonized and cast aside by ableist, capitalist culture.5 I found comfort in environments whose burdens were as heavy as my own and utilized these environments as partners for mourning as well as spaces of alternative strategy for practicing nonnormativity.6 Bringing disability into conversation with ravaged environments has been an essential part of how I’ve navigated and survived normative culture. These environments accepted me without complication: they taught me, before disability studies could, that physical disability is a condition of relational misfitting.7 Like me, these environments had been cast as misfits—unrestorable bodies—and under my gaze, they became a new baseline of correspondence, one that replaced ableist culture and its means of comparison.

Sara J. Grossman, writing in Living Lexicon

Thoughts: nonnormativity, ferality, disability, anti-psychiatry, neuro-divergence.

 

Subscribe

Get the latest posts delivered to your email: