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Wild

A Charm Against The Language Of Politics

A Charm Against The Language Of Politics
by Veronica Patterson

 

Say over and over the names of things,
the clean nouns: weeping birch, bloodstone, tanager, Banshee damask rose.

Read field guides, atlases, gravestones.

At the store, bless each apple by kind: McIntosh, Winesap, Delicious, Jonathan.

Enunciate the vegetables and herbs: okra, calendula.

Go deeper into the terms of some small landscape:
spiders, for example. Then, after a speech on
compromising the environment for technology,
recite the tough, silky structure of webs: tropical stick, ladder web, mesh web, filmy dome, funnel, trap door.

When you have compared the candidates’ slippery platforms, chant the spiders: comb footed, round headed, garden cross, feather legged, ogre faced, black widow.

Remember that most short verbs are ethical: hatch, grow, spin, trap, eat.

Dig deep, pronounce clearly, pull the words
in over your head.

Hole up for the duration.

Feraculture: Philosophy, Pigeon-Ideas & Notes

Statement of Interest. Notes.

I’m fascinated (obsessed by, perhaps) by the notion of ferality, as described by Merriam-Webster as;

 

Definition of feral:

a. of, relating to, or suggestive of a wild beast (feral teeth) (feral instincts).

b. not domesticated or cultivated (feral animals).

c. having escaped from domestication and become wild (feral cats).

 

This definition pictures a previously domesticated animal that has returned to a natural state; city dogs, ponies, humans who have ‘gone wild‘. One way of thinking about this is a previously colonized creature now living in nonnormative ways, and exhibiting nonnormative traits.

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